18th Feb 1862 (To Aunt)

To  Miss A Johnston

Matron
The Spinning House
Cambridge
England

My dear Aunt

I received your welcome letter and was glad to hear you were enjoying good health. I had no time to answer it before last Mail as at present I am doing the duty of Superintendent in addition to my own duties, which leaves me very little time to myself; the present Superintendent is going on Pension. I have applied for the situation but cannot say whether I will be successful in getting it or no. It has been advertised in the papers, the salary is Rupees250 with Rs30 for House Rent, in all £28-0-0 per month. At present I am in receipt of Rs150 having had a rise of Rs30 from the 1st of January.

My dear Aunt, you would never take me for a soldier, in fact I am only in name. I never wear Regimentals on any occasion. I can hold my situation either as a soldier or a civilian, but I prefer the former because I can look forward to a pension andI am looking forward to be made a Warrant Officer which gives a very good pension. I like my place very well, there is a great deal to do but I like it the better for that as it keeps my mind always employed. This is a beautiful station, so close to the Hills (the lower range of the Himalayas). The college is a fine building; I enclose an Engraving of it. The Building you see in the background is my printing office and there is a similar building on the other side where the Lithe and Wood Engraving Depts are. Since commencing this I have been made officiating Superintendent with Rs50 a month extra, but enough about myself.

I am happy to say my little boy is keeping very well and I trust he will keep so during the ensuing hot weather.

My dear Aunt, you must excuse this scroll. I will give you all the news I can in my next but I have a lot of work before me tonight and tomorrow. The mail leaves so you must excuse me.

You mention about my having a cousin here. He is a long way off and not the slightest chance of meeting. Now do write on return and give us news you have.

I remain Dear Aunt

Your affectionate Nephew

J Johnston

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